Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Classic Cream Scones Recipe






Today I'm sharing a little 
cream scone recipe
I received from a friend
some time ago.
This recipe reminds me of 
wonderfully rich scone I had with 
clotted cream and jam
in England 
about 10 years ago...




When I flew with my children over to England
to visit my brother and his family in 2005,
my sister~in~law took me to a tea room
in the small town of St. Ives.

We went thrift shopping that day
and it may be the day I bought a tea cart
or the day when
she bought a beautiful 6’ tall
Welsh dresser for her kitchen.

I know we found many wonderful books
during the whole trip and a vintage copy of
Pride and Prejudice.



I don’t really remember what we found that day,
but
what I do remember is the
scrumptious scones we had in the afternoon
which melted in your mouth and were paired 
with a pot of tea
from a
little tea shop
in a town so picturesque
it stepped out of a fairy tale.


This scone recipe comes close 
to that scone…



Classic Cream Scones
Fine Cooking magazine, Winter 2004
published by freelance writer Carol Anderson
reviewed for a newspaper (unknown)

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour                                                                 For the glaze:
1/3 cup granulated sugar                                                             1 lg. egg, beaten with
1 Tbsp. baking powder                                                                  1 Tbsp. milk
½ tsp. salt                                                                                          sprinkle sugar on top
½ cup dried currants (or any dried fruit)                                             
6 Tbsp. cold unsalted butter, cut into small cubes                                   
¾ cup heavy cream
2 large egg yolks

Position oven rack in lower third of the oven; heat oven to 425 degrees.  Line a heavy baking sheet with parchment paper sprinkled with flour. 

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.  Add currants, tossing until evenly distributed and coated with flour (I put dried cranberries in my scones this time).  Cut in butter with pastry blender until the largest pieces are about the size of peas.

In a small bowl, stir cream and egg yolks just to blend.  Add this all at once to flour mixture.  Stir with a fork to begin combining the wet and dry ingredients, then use your hands to gently knead mixture together until all dry ingredients are absorbed into dough and it can be gathered into a ball.  Don’t overknead.  **Tip: if you don't have any cream on hand, replace with sour cream thinned and whisked with a little milk. 

The dough is sticky at this point.  Set the ball on floured parchment paper and pat it gently into a round that is 1” thick.  Cut round into 8 wedges (*I used a heart-shaped cookie cutter).  Separate wedges slightly.  Brush scones with glaze; sprinkle a bit of sugar on them. 

Bake until the scones are deep golden and a toothpick inserted into the center of a wedge comes out clean.  This will take 13 to 15 minutes. 

Slide the parchment onto a rack and let the scones cool for about 10 minutes before serving.  Makes 8.



***Carol Anderson says in her article that “good scones follow three basic rules of biscuit making: plenty of cold butter and cream, a light hand when mixing, and a high oven temperature.  **My tip: If you’d like to make your scones like those you’d have as a mid-afternoon tea, make a bigger round scone.  The one I had in England was a bigger scone and was meant almost like a meal.



I hope when you bake these they will
bring you many happy memories
as they did me.
Enjoy,
Barb :)




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