Monday, April 10, 2017

Incredible Texas Wildflowers!


Texas bluebonnets standing tall in a side road meadow... This is a raw photo with no alterations.


This is my first year
photographing wildflowers 
in Texas ~
and I am loving it!





This photo I played around with...
The lupine are just incredible!
We had lupine in California, even in 
my own backyard.
They don't like good garden soil
preferring rocky soil, really.

And those seeds you see there?
They are easy to collect and save in a
paper bag to sprinkle about your meadow
for next spring's flowers.


I love the name "Texas bluebonnets"
and have wondered where and how these
blue lupine got that nickname.
so...
I went researching it.
:)

Here's a bit of that fun information

Bluebonnets are named after the bonnets women 
used to wear to protect themselves from 
the hot prairie sun.

Bluebonnets are only up for a short
few weeks in March and April.

Bluebonnets will grow in most
any place in the world 
reseeding themselves and acting as perennials
in warmer areas, and as annuals in colder climates.

Bluebonnets became the Texas state flower
back in 1910.
I found some of this information online at
The Austinot.

The Texas Dept. of Transportation also
had a lot to say about growing wild lupine ~
saying bluebonnets do best in alkaline soil 
which drains well.
Plus, they said to plant seeds from 
Sept 1st through December
but best by 
November for seeds to germinate well.



Places to buy wildflower seeds online:

American Meadows
http://www.americanmeadows.com/texas-bluebonnet-seeds
American Meadows seeds were $9.95.

Amazon.com
type in "bluebonnet seeds" and their web browser will take you
to the correct location.  1000 seeds run $12.95.

Bulk Seed Store.com
http://www.bulkseedstore.com/



A small field of wild Queen Anne's Lace reaching their ethereal faces towards the heavens.


Near the bluebonnets I found some
Queen Anne's Lace and 
soft pink primroses...
sigh!
Next time I see a field of Queen Anne's Lace
I need to remember to pick a few
as I read that they dry well.

Love the tiny florets on this head of Queen Anne's Lace!

Wouldn't they be pretty in a dried flower
arrangement?


A lovely mixed field of tall Queen Anne's Lace {dead center and up}, blue bonnets and pink primrose...


Amazingly beautiful and oddly fake-looking
these beauties are just madly blooming away...


Primroses get about 6" tall out in the yard ~ such beauty that grows in massive drifts in some places!


I am in love with these pink primroses!
I've also seen white and yellow primroses.
Some yellow were growing in my little yard.
I tried digging them up and transplanting them
into a pot but they didn't like it.






I took some photos at the park
with my new iPhone 6 the other day.
If you'd like to see those
check out my Instagram page to see them!
{Barbara Chapman/French Ethereal}


I hope you've liked this little
wildflower tour around North Texas!
I'm looking forward to seeing 
your wildflowers, too.
I'll see if I can create a wildflower event
on my Facebook page.
Wouldn't that be fun?
:)

Happy wildflower Monday,
Barb :)


Sharing with
Dishing It Digging It ~ Rustic and Refined
Inspire Me Monday ~ Create with Joy
A Life in Balance
Family Joy Link Up ~ Thinking Outside the Pot

Create Link Inspire ~ The Crafty Blog Stalker
http://thecraftyblogstalker.com/create-link-inspire-linky-party/

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